Category Archives: Trust

Government as a low-trust environment

The US government is, deliberately and structurally, a low trust environment. Think about why we have a “system of checks and balances.” We have proudly created a government structure that is self-correcting and that incarnates our distrust of each branch of the government. Why is freedom of the press such an important value to us? Because we all want transparency into the government’s actions – not to celebrate its fine management practices, but to know when it is doing something wrong. Within the government, we have Inspectors General to investigate misbehavior, Ombudsmen to make sure we are serving the public, and a Government Accountability Office. To work in the government is to work in an environment where people are watching to make sure you do the right thing. It is a culture of mistrust.

That sounds horrible, and from the standpoint of classic agile software development thinking, it is unworkable. But take a step back – don’t we sort of like this about the government? “Distrust” has unpleasant connotations, but as a systematic way of setting up a government, there is a lot to be said for it. It is another way of saying that the government is accountable to the people. You could almost say – you might want to hold on to your chairs here, agile thinkers – that mistrust is actually a value in the government context. So where does that leave us if agile thinking wants us to deliver as much value as possible, but believes that agile approaches require trust?

It might sound academic, but I think solving this dilemma is critical to finding ways to bring agile thinking into the federal government. A typical IT project experiences this structural distrust over and over: in the reams of documentation it is required to produce, in the layers of oversight and reviews it must face, and in the constraints imposed on it.

I will argue that even in a low trust environment, agile approaches are still the best way to deliver IT systems. And that certain tools – borrowed primarily from DevOps – actually help us resolve the dilemma. Waterfall approaches fit well with mistrustful environments by holding out the promise of accountability and control – but they just don’t work. So how can we bring agile, lean, team-based processes into an environment that is structurally mistrustful, and realize our goal of a lean bureaucracy?